Senior lawyers protest as Juniors wear grown and wig to parties- Pictures gallery

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Senior lawyers protest as Juniors wear grown and wig to parties- Pictures gallery

The legal professionals (Lawyers) are called learned and humble men and women, before the digital age they were seen as conservative and at the Apex seen as upright and just umpires.
Judges were highly respected, no parties, no high flying social gatherings, not partisan in politics etc, all have changed to in the 21st Century digital world.
As if all this wasn’t enough, the real digital age generation lawyers are at it wearing Legal and judicial costume (gown and wig) to parties.
Below is a copy of protest letter from a senior lawyer to the legal  practitioners  disciplinary  committee.

September  16,  2020

The  Chairman,
Legal  Practitioners  Disciplinary  Committee
Federal  Capital  Territory-  Abuja

Dear  Sir,

URGENT  CALL TO  REDRESS  DRESS  CODE  MISCONDUCT  AND  UNETHICAL  CONDUCT AND DISREPUTE  TO THE LEGAL PROFESSION

I  write  to  bring  to  your  attention  the  severe  disrepute  into  which  the  Legal  Profession has  been brought  particularly  by  greenhorn  legal  practitioners.   The  legal  practitioners  robes/garb  which  include  our  Wig  and  Gown  has  been  extremely abused and reduced  to  a  nonstandard  by  our  colleagues  who deem  it  fit  in  gross  violation of  the  Rules  of  Professional  Conduct  for  Legal  Practitioners  (RPC)  to  wear  same  along with  varying  outrageous  colours  and  styles  of  clothing  and  further  post  pictures  of  this abuse for  public  consumption.

Reiterating  the  respect  and  sanctity  to  be  accorded  to  our  garb,  I  reproduce  Rule  45  (2) (a)  of  the  Rules of  Professional Conduct  for  Legal  Practitioners:

(2) A  lawyer  SHALL NOT  wear the  Barrister’s or Senior  Advocate’s robe  – (a)  on  any  occasion  other  than  in  Court  except  as  may  be  directed  or  permitted by  the  Bar Council;  …

The  mischief  the  rule  above  was  made  to  cure  was  an  abuse  of  the  lawyer  robes.  Sir, today,  such  abuse  is  wanton  and  uncontrolled.  It  has  been  said  that  the  dress  a  lawyer wears  whether  in  or  out  of  court  must  be  tidy,  respectable  and  sober;  not  flamboyant, sadly,  this  is  not  the  case  today. 

Kindly  find  attached  some  pictures  of  recently  called  legal  practitioners  evincing  the outrageous  dress  styles  bringing  the  lawyer  robes  and  by  extension  the  profession  to disrepute.  While  celebrating  the  no  small  feat  of  getting  called  to  the  bar  is  necessary, such  celebrations  should  be  done  with  utmost  decorum  and  regard,  as  expected  of  a Barrister  and  Solicitor  of  the  Supreme  Court  of  Nigeria  and  not  in  a  manner  to  obliterate respect,  dignity and  honour  of  the  hallowed  profession.

Sir,  the  legal  profession  is  a  very  serious,  noble  and  conservative  one.  In  Okafor  &  ors  v. Nweke  &  Ors  [2007]  LPELR-2412(SC)  the  Learned  Justice  of  the  Supreme  Court,  W.S. Onnoghen  said:

“Legal  practice  is  a  very  serious  business  that  is  to  be  undertaken  by  serious minded  practitioners  particularly  as  both  the  legally  trained  minds  and  those  not so  trained  always  learn  from  our  examples.  We  therefore  owe  the  legal profession  the  duty  to  maintain  the very high  standards required  in  the  practice of the profession  in  this  country.”

Sir,  our  robes  have  been  worn  for  over  300  years  and  our  wigs  have  been  worn  since  the year  1680.  Our  profession  has  a  rich  history  and  culture  that  must  be  preserved, therefore  I  urge  you  to  kindly  use  your  good  office  to  nip  this  bastardization  of  our hallowed  profession  in  the  bud  before  the  situation  escalates.  I  am  willing  to  supply information  concerning  the  offending  practitioners  in  a  separate  petition  should  they refuse to  cease and  desist  from  their  unethical  conduct.

Please  accept,  Mr  Chairman, the  assurances  of  my  highest  regards.

Yours  Faithfully,

B.  Inem  Esq.

CC:   1. The Chief  Justice of  Nigeria 2.  The  Chairman, Body  of  Benchers  Nigeria 3.  The Attorney General  of the  Federation 4.  The Chairman, Council  of Legal  Education 5.  The President, Nigerian  Bar  Association

Misty Uba
Misty Uba
Misty, A Brand Developer, Broadcaster and a Trained Engineer with great passion for motor sports especially Formula 1 for over 20 years.

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